Awesome Everywhere!

United Arab Emirates

Dubai

United States

Alaska

Ann Arbor, MI

Asheville, NC

Atlanta, GA

Austin, TX

Baltimore, MD

Birmingham, AL

Boone County, IN

Boston, MA

Buffalo, NY

Cass Clay

Chicago, IL

Denver, CO

Gainesville, FL

Gloucester, MA

Los Angeles, CA

Louisville, KY

Miami, FL

New York City, NY

Newburgh, NY

North Minneapolis, MN

Northern Virginia (NOVA)

Oahu, HI

Oakland, CA

Oklahoma City, OK

Orlando, FL

Philadelphia, PA

Piqua, OH

Pittsburgh, PA

Plano, TX

Port Washington, NY

Portland, OR

Poughkeepsie, NY

Pueblo, CO

Raleigh-Durham, NC

Rochester, NY

Rockport, MA

San Antonio, TX

San Francisco, CA

San Jose, CA

Santa Cruz, CA

Santa Fe, NM

Seattle, WA

South Bend, IN

State College, PA

Tallahassee, FL

Washington, DC

Youngstown, OH

Dark Matter

This project is a series of combined, sculptural objects modeled in Maya and 3D printed to form humorous juxtapositions. The objects chosen for this series are the objects/things that are forbidden or un-welcome in Iran by the government. Objects that in many other countries people use or own freely but under Iranian government laws (for several reasons) are forbidden or discouraged to use. Owning some of these objects means going to jail, or getting a fine, or constantly being under the risk of getting arrested or bothered by the moral police.

Using 3D printing technology, the act of printing itself serves as an important aspect of the project. By printing and bringing the virtual 3D into physical existence, I want to simultaneously resist and bring awareness about the power that constantly threatens, discourages, and actively works against the ownership of these objects/things. No matter how functional, through 3D printing, I am able to re-create and archive a collection of forbidden objects. In a way, the objects serve as the documentation of lives lived under oppressions and dictatorship. The documentation of a history full of red lines drawn in the most private aspect of one’s life; the most ordinary things. In addition, combining and printing these objects create a re-presentation of my own personal memory of life in Iran. Memory itself is re-collection, re-presentation, and re-arrangement of events. Both the memory sculpture notion of the piece and the printing aspect of it consolidate to resist forgetting.

Funded by Awesome Without Borders (February 2014)